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Print of Calcutta - Chandpaul Ghaut. with Steam Engine, Supreme Court. 07072

Chandpaul Ghaut. Steam Engine, Supreme Court. Plate 1 from William Wood's "Series of Twenty Eight Panoramic Views of Calcutta". An original lithographic print from 1833. The first plate from the collection of 28 lithographic prints produced in 1833 by William Wood of 428 The Strand, London and sold originally in five parts, the prints loose and without any text, Abbey Travel [495] notes that 82 sets were subscribed for in India and only 38 in England. This was the first lithographic printing of plates of Calcutta. The plate pasted to later brown card with marks on the back of the card where the picture has been fastened into a frame (now lacking), the printed area clean but a few grubby marks in the margins and damp stains at the top left and lower right corners, overall size 19 x 14ins [49 x 25cm]. This image shows the Supreme Court building with masts of ships on the Hooghly visible over the roofs and to the left. There is a good description of this series by Wood (with several illustrations) in J P Losty's Calcutta City of Palaces [British Library 1990].

£280.00
Taj Mahal, a 19th Century miniature on ivory 06629

Agra School mid 19th century. Small oval picture in watercolour on ivory, approximate size 50mm x 40m. The miniature is pasted to old paper inscribed in ink in a contemporary hand "Taj Garden Side Agra" the miniature has been sealed with paper to a glass (now lacking but traces of paper remain), and was probably originally in a box or hardwood black frame. The miniature, finely painted and in bright condition shows the Taj Mahal from its most iconic viewpoint looking from the main entrance down the tree lined avenue containing water tanks against a clouded blue sky. The image has retained particularly fresh colours because it has been kept from the light for a long time. The miniature is one of the type produced as souvenirs in the mid nineteenth century and is of much superior quality to the modern reproductions to be found today. Accompanied by a related gilt brass mount of the type used in daguerrotype cases.

£140.00
Taj Mahal. A mid 19th Century oval miniature on ivory. 10037

Agra School, mid 19th century. A small oval miniature painting on ivory of the Taj Mahal, approximate size 62 x 50mm. The view shows the Taj from across the River Jumna with part of the gateway on the left. It retains its original glazed inner frame of silvered metal which would have been fitted into a carved box or frame. There are some dirt marks across the areas of the sky and sea which look as though they are on the inside of the glass rather than on the painting but we have not removed the miniature from the frame into which it is tightly fixed. This is the type high quality miniature produced in the mid nineteenth century to satisfy the English demand for souvenirs of India.

£130.00
Gateway to the Taj Mahal, a mid 19th Century miniature watercolour on ivory. 06630

Agra School, mid 19th century. A particularly small oval picture in watercolour on ivory, approximate size 35mm x 28m, The miniature is unmounted but retains traces of old paper where it has been sealed with paper to a glass and was probably originally in a box or hardwood black frame. The miniature, finely painted and in bright condition shows the Gateway to the Taj Mahal against a clouded blue sky. The image has retained particularly fresh colours although there is a very small area of loss in the bottom right foreground and some rubbing to the grass on the left has lost a small area of green. The miniature is one of the type produced as souvenirs in the mid nineteenth century and is of much superior quality to the modern reproductions to be found today.

£70.00
Hand drawn map of India placing some of the battles. 00000985

An attractive little hand drawn map, 11 x 15cm, sepia ink with blue wash on thick paper, probably late Victorian. In neat penwork the map shows mountains and principal cities and indicates the sites of the battles of Plassey, Arcot, Kandahar, Lucknow, and Cawnpore. This may have been drawn shortly after the Mutiny period. It has been cut very close to the border lines on the left side and would would look good in a an old deep frame.

£35.00
A small early Victorian watercolour of the Calcutta Ball, 1844 07491

. Trench, Philip Charles: Calcutta Season Ball. Watercolour of an Officer and a Lady Dancing, Dated Calcutta Dec 30th 1844. An amusing amateur watercolour drawing on paper of a couple dancing, dated Dec 30th 1844, 5 x 6.5ins. A young lady dances in a lively fashion with a military officer in dress uniform. Signed and dated P C Trench. single faint vertical fold line. Philip Charles Trench was appointed to the Bengal Civil Service in 1827. He was Magistrate at Mozoffernugger in 1836, Collector at Mirzapore in 1839, Ghazeepore in 1848, Civil Sessions Judge at Seharanpore 1854 and retired in 1859 after the Indian Mutiny. An atmospheric little picture epitomising the gaiety of the Calcutta Season in the very early Victorian period. The young lady may well have been a member of the "Fishing Fleet" which appeared each season to search for a good match among the Bengal Civil Service and the Officers of the armies of the East India Company and the Queen.

£45.00
North West Frontier. A large pen and ink wash drawing, circa 1890 10045

The drawing, on strong paper, measures 15 x 11 ins and is in very good condition, the reerse has a line of old brown paper at the top where it has been tipped into an album perhaps. The view is not identified but came with other NWF drawings.

£85.00
Chowringhee Road, showing Eliot’s & Harrington Street, 1833. Litho by Wood, 1833. 10049

The 21st plate from the collection of 28 lithographic prints produced in 1833 by William Wood of 428 The Strand, London and sold originally in five parts, the prints loose and without any text. This plate was printed by Graf & Soret. Abbey Travel [495] notes that 82 sets were subscribed for in India and only 38 in England. This was the first lithographic printing of plates of Calcutta. The plate is pasted to later brown card with marks on the back of the card where the picture has been fastened into a frame (now lacking), the printed area clean but a few grubby marks in the margins a damp stains at the lower left corner, overall size 19 x 14ins [49 x 25cm]. An attractive view of some of the great Calcutta mansions of the day with animals and Indian figures in the foreground. There is a good description of this series by Wood (with several illustrations) in J P Losty's Calcutta City of Palaces [British Library 1990]. [

£300.00
Chowringhee Road with a lady leaving a mansion in an open carriage, 1833. Litho by Wood 10050

A plate [possibly no 16] from the collection of 28 lithographic prints produced in 1833 by William Wood of 428 The Strand, London and sold originally in five parts, the prints loose and without any text. Abbey Travel [495] notes that 82 sets were subscribed for in India and only 38 in England. This was the first lithographic printing of plates of Calcutta. The plate is pasted to later brown card with marks on the back of the card where the picture has been fastened into a frame (now lacking), the printed area clean but a few grubby marks in the margins and stains at the lower left corner, overall size 19 x 14ins [49 x 25cm]. This plate has been trimmed to within the plate margins and has thus lost its printed title. An attractive view of some of the great Calcutta mansions of the day with animals and Indian figures in the foreground as well as the cariage. There is a good description of this series by Wood (with several illustrations) in J P Losty's Calcutta City of Palaces [British Library 1990].

£220.00
Sepoys exercising. A pen and ink drawing dated 1852 11005

Macdonald, Henry: Sepoys Exercising , 1852. A small pen and sepia ink drawing showing two British officers with several sepoys, 16 x 9.5mm, a single vertical fold where it has been folded to send in a letter, inscribed in a contemporary hand on the verso in pencil No 3 Received December 27th 1852. The drawing is unsigned but came with an archive of Macdonald and is typical of his somewhat naive but atmospheric style. Some damp staining to the sides but not showing greatly on the drawing.

£120.00
Coromandel Coast, English and Dutch Forts, early 19th century hand coloured engraving 10053

An engraving, 348 x 233mm], with decent wide margins, presumably form a book or set of prints, numbered 30 at the top right and captioned on the lower margin in pencil in French "Fort des Anglais et des Hollandais a Cormorando. Clean although the paper a little wrinkled.

£45.00
Major General Sir Robert H Sale, GCB &c. An engraving by T Lupton after G Clint 07481

Major General Sir Robert H Sale, GCB &c ...print of their distinguished colonel is dedicated by the officers of the 13th Prince Albert's Light Infantry The mezzotint, 13 x 17.5ins image size, is trimmed to the plate lines or just within them although all the engraved title remains, edge tears without loss and the lower margin a little ragged. A very attractive portrait of the hero of Jalalabad showing the General three quarter length against a mountainous background with a fortress [presumably Jalalabad]. He is depicted in full dress uniform with stars and a sash of his orders and the medals from Seringapatam, Jalalabad, Ghazni, and Cabul and his right hand rests on a general officer's sword. Sale [1782-1845] was a brave soldier, known in his lifetime as "Fighting Bob". He served in Mauritius, Seringapatam, the First Afghan War and was mortally wounded by grape shot in the First Sikh War at the Battle of Mudki. The dedication notes that the original painting by George Clint is in the possession of the 13th Light Infantry. The engraving is dated 1845. Sale's widow survived to write an important book on the disasters she had partly escaped.

£300.00
General Sir James Hope Grant, a large engraved portrait 10084

A very large unframed engraving, after a painting by Francis Grant RA, showing Gen Sir James Hope Grant full length in undress uniform (with sword and field cap), standing in front of a cannon with the Taku Forts in the background. The print, 18 x 29ins overall, is on thin card and has been trimmed just within the plate mark at the lower edge, a water stain runs across the left corner, mainly visible in the white margins, tear without loss bottom right through word Madras, some creasing at extremities. James Hope Grant (1808-1868) was with the 9th Lancers and served in the First China War 1840-42, the First and Second Sikh Wars, was Brigadier of Cavalry in the Mutiny (Siege of Delhi, Relief of Lucknow, Cawnpore), and commanded in the Second China War of 1860-61 when he captured the Taku Forts and Pekin (commemorated in this engraving). The engraving shows Grant at the time of his successes in China but it is noticeable that far from carrying a general's sword he leans on an Indian tulwar of a type used in the Sikh Wars.

£180.00
An 1806 large engraving of William Pitt after Gainsborough by William Bromley 07762

A large engraving of the well known Gainsborough portrait showing the Prime Minister standing by a desk and holding a Bill in his right hand. The portrait has had some old restoration and is mounted on a protective card. It was engraved by William Bromley and published in London by Robert F Boeyer. The repairs are mainly to marginal tears of which only a very few had extended into the printed area. The engraving retains plate marks, measuring 19 x 29ins to that point, and a further margin of over an inch, The portrait was engraved in the year of Pitt's death in office. Pitt's India Bills of 1784 established the complicated rule of India by Crown and Company which was to endure until the Mutiny of 1857.

£220.00
A large engraving of William Pitt by John Keyes Sherwin after Gainsborough, 1789 07763

Pitt is shown half length with document on a desk. The engraving has been cut down within the plate marks and the legend at the bottom is rather damaged but still readable.The engraved portrait is in good condition and has long ago been mounted on a strengthening sheet of paper. Sherwin was a well regarded follower of the more famous Bartolozzi. The portrait was engraved in the year of the French Revolution. Pitt's India Bills of 1784 established the complicated rule of India by Crown and Company which was to endure until the Mutiny of 1857. 13 x 15ins image size, not including the legend beneath the portrait.

£150.00
Warren Hastings - Original Engraved Portrait Dated 1797 06599

An interesting engraved portrait showing a good portrait bust in an oval on a plinth bearing his name, at the left side an Indian warrior looking up towards the the portrait, on the other side an unarmed Indian bowing towards the ex-Governor General, clean condition, unframed, image size 8.5ins x 12ins. Although there is a reasonable and appropriate degree of border for the size of the image the fact that there is no apparent plate mark may indicate that the margin has once been greater, bottom left reads "Engraved by Wm. Bromley from the Original Picture" and bottom right "Published by Wm Bromley, June 29th 1797". The portrait dates from shortly after Hastings was acquitted after his lengthy impeachment trial in Parliament.

£270.00
Watercolour of coaching days in India 11085

An attractive watercolour, 18 x 10.75ins [45.5 x 27cm], painted in India for the European market, indistinctly signed and dated lower left "Punjabi Naoraji 18??" [the date could be 1839 or 1889].The painting is on paper laid on a later card, minor damage at the edges of the paper with small areas of loss, tears without loss from bottom left and top right corners. There is also damage with loss of paper to the central figure of the group at the bottom right, which has been crudely painted over to disguise the fact. At first glance the scene resembles a standard view of horse drawn vehicles passing an elegant Calcutta mansion but on more careful examination it seems to be a satirical caricature. The elegant trap on the left, driven by a gentleman with a seated lady and accompanied by a running footman, is about to pass a closed coach carrying two caricatured natives pulled by a pair of emaciated ponies and driven by a wild eyed looking boy. By contrast the European's horse is a very sprightly looking , well groomed animal. The dog walkers with their assorted charges form a focal point in the foreground while European ladies observe the scene from the colonnaded balcony of the mansion. The watercolour has been recently presented in an adapted mid nineteenth century maple frame which is available for anyone who arranges collection but the watercolour will only be posted unframed as glazed frames do not travel well in our experience.

£950.00
An officer on the Bengal Staff, a mid 19th century oil painting 11114

A good and decorative portrait of an officer holding his sword in the crook of his left arm and shown three quarter length wearing frock coat. The painting is in oil on canvas and the original canvas has been remounted [probably late 20th century] on new canvas and stretcher. It appears to have been cleaned and re-varnished at the same time and although there may have been some retouching around the edges of the brown background we cannot detect any work having been done to the figure. The picture is now very sound and is presented unframed. The Cheltenham family from whom the painting originated could not remember whom it represented: many military and civilian servants of the East India Company and later Indian services retired to Cheltenham. The canvas measures 20.5 x 25.5 ins [52 x 65cm].

£400.00
Moghul tombs or mausolea. A Victorian watercolour 11158

Probably painted in India by an English amateur watercolourist in a strong, confident but somewhat naive style, this painting on paper shows a view of Moghul tombs similar to those found in Delhi and around Agra and Lucknow. We cannot identify a precise place and the view may indeed be a capriccio one and it is not signed or dated. The view is in excellent clean, bright condition: the reverse has marks at the corners showing removal from an album page. The dimensions are 10 x 7ins [26 17cm]. A pleasing decorative image.

£75.00
Hunting the wild boar in the “Blue Valley”. Ink drawing on paper, mid 19th century. 11159

An amusing amateur drawing, possibly by a soldier, showing a European escaping a rushing wild boar by hanging on to a low lying tree branch, his percussion pistol dropping from his hand. Titled along the lower edge in a contemporary hand, unsigned and undated but probably mid 19th century, 8 x 5ins [20 x 12.5cm]. Faint vertical folds [such quick sketches are often found sent back in letters to Britain by those serving in India]. The drawing is in clean, sound condition. The Blue Valley was a popular hunting destination in the Nilgiri Hills.

£35.00
Interior of a rather makeshift bungalow, India, late Victorian watercolour. 11160

Probably painted by the same hand a item 11158 above, this strongly executed watercolour shows the interior of a single building with open beams that looks as though it may be in the process of being made habitable. A cello leaning against a heavily carved sofa or day bed suggests a musical talent and there are several very typical items of furniture that are often found in officers’ bungalows – a folding campaign chair , a wicker tub chair, etc. The painting is on strong paper and in good condition: the reverse shows marks that it has been removed from an album page.

£60.00
Major General John Day Stokes, Madras Infantry. Oil portrait, English School, circa 1855. 11172

John Day Stokes joined the Madras Army in 1817 and served in several regiments, becoming a lieutenant colonel in 1841. He acted as private secretary on the staff of Lord Metcalfe and was Resident at the court of Mysore in the 1840s. In 1854 he was promoted to major general. He died in Tralee, County Kerry in 1862. The portrait is painted in oil on canvas and there appears to be no signature. The visible canvas measures 22 x 27ins 56 x 69cm] and the overall size of the frame is 31 x 36ins [71 x 91cm. The bust length portrait shows Stokes in the uniform of a Colonel, a rank he achieved in 1851 would suggest that it was painted shortly before he achieved his highest rank rank in 1854. He was on furlough in 1853/4 and perhaps the portrait was painted when he was England then. It has been cleaned and re-lined. The gilt gesso decorated frame is probably the original and certainly of the period although it has been fairly recently re-painted, probably when the painting was relined. An old label on the reverse has some family details and is dated 1952.

£1,900.00
Red Fort, Delhi. A miniature painting of the Audience Hall, 19th century 11173

A mid 19th century Indian miniature of the highly decorated interior of the Diwan–i-Am or Audience Hall of the Red Fort in Delhi. Painted on ivory the oval miniature measures approximately 5 x 3.5 ins [13 x 9cm and is in a gilt metal inner frame within an intricately carved ebony frame [overall sixe 9 x 9.5ins, 23 x 24cm]. The back has a wooden easel strut [probably a replacement for an earlier metal one. The condition is excellent even though the painting has lost its glass guard at some time. Such paintings became very popular with Europeans visiting India or returning after service there from the mid century onwards.

£550.00
An Indian Retainer Offering a Rosewater Bottle on a Tray. Watercolour of Mid Nineteenth Century 08143

An attractive amateur watercolour painting on paper, 15 x 22cm, of a servant offering a rosewater bottle on a tray. Although not signed or dated this watercolour came to us with several others signed by P C Trench in an archive of material from the Macdonald of Sandside family in northern Scotland. Philip Charles Trench was appointed to the Bengal Civil Service in 1827. He was Magistrate at Mozoffernugger in 1836, Collector at Mirzapore in 1839, Ghazeepore in 1848, Civil Sessions Judge at Seharanpore 1854 and retired in 1859 after the Indian Mutiny. An atmospheric image of a servant ina long tradition of such paiintings which were a subject often favourd by those illustrating the life of a company servant.

£70.00
An Indian Holding a Spear, Probably a Watchman. Watercolour of Mid Nineteenth Century 08134

An attractive amateur watercolour painting on paper of a an Indian holding a spear, probably a watchman. Although not signed or dated this watercolour came to us with several others signed by P C Trench in an archive of material from the Macdonald of Sandside family in northern Scotland. Philip Charles Trench was appointed to the Bengal Civil Service in 1827. He was Magistrate at Mozoffernugger in 1836, Collector at Mirzapore in 1839, Ghazeepore in 1848, Civil Sessions Judge at Seharanpore 1854 and retired in 1859 after the Indian Mutiny. An atmospheric image of a servant ina long tradition of such paiintings which were a subject often favourd by those illustrating the life of a company servant.

£50.00
Bengal Horse Artillery. Portrait of Capt T Nicholl, killed at Jagdallak, Afghanistan 1841 08170

Captain Thomas Nicholl, 1st Troop, 1st Brigade, Bengal Horse Artillery. A miniature painting of the Company School, watercolour on card, 5 x 6ins, indistinctly signed By J.... and dated 1836. The miniature is unevenly faded where the sunlight has reached the main portrait but not the edges which have been behind the gilt slip beneath the glass. The picture is still in the contemporary or slightly later deep gilt frame, overall size 9 x 11 ins and 2.5 ins in depth. The backing board has an old label identifying the sitter. The portrait shows the officer bust length wearing the mess jacket of the illustrious and highly regarded Bengal Horse Artillery, blue with red facings and gilt lace. Captain Thomas Nicholl was commissioned into the Bengal Horse Artillery in 1831 and was serving with the 1st Troop of the 1st Brigade during the First Afghan War when he was killed in action commanding the troop during the retreat from Kabul. To quote from a History of the The First Afghan War “An entire gun detachment of 1/1 Ben HA perished rather than lose their gun and the troop lost 30 of its weakened strength....Jagdallak was reached on the 11th [Jan 1841] and there Captain Nicholl, commanding the troops, was killed together with another 26 gunners. Before he was killed Nicholl, with a party of his gunners, had been acting as cavalry and had charged and routed a body of mounted Afghans. Very few left Jagdallak for Gandamak on the 13th, when Stewart and the gallant Sergeant Mulhall, the last gunners alive, were killed. The First of the First had ceased to exist.”

£2,300.00
Gen Sir Colin Campbell and Gen Sir Henry Havelock. A double portrait on porcelain 11207

An unusual double portrait of the two generals painted on porcelain, the visible oval approx 9 x 12ins and within a gilt painted wooden oval grame with an outer plain black wooden frame, unglazed.The painting was probably done in the third quarter of the 19th century, possibly quite soon after the Indian Mutiny when the two generals were at the height of their fame following the relief of Lucknow. This is alluded to on the scroll in front of Havelock who died at the time of victory. There is an repaired break or crack [we have not yet removed the backing of hardboard to check this] which runs from the top centre to the left side, fortunately not touching Campbell's head.

£450.00
A View of the West side of Tank Square, Calcutta, by James Baillie Fraser, 1826 08194

An attractive coloured print of a lively view of activity around the tank in Calcutta. It was drawn by James Baillie Fraser for his collection of engravings "Views of Calcutta and its Environs which was published i a number of parts over the years 1824-26. This is plate 18 and was published in the 6th part of edition. It was engraved by R Havell [Abbey Travel vol 2 No 494] The print is on paper mounted on old card. The areas outside the coloured image are rather damaged where it has been partly stuck to an old window mount in which it has been framed. The coloured area is affected at the extremities but the old paper is removable with care. The main coloured are is in excellent condition. The print retains an old card mount with an aperture for the title [although the word Calcutta has been damaged. 19 x 13ins overall.

£160.00
The Commandant of the Town Guard with two young East India Company officers or cadets, 1843 080195

An amusing pencil drawing dated 1843 showing two young East India officers or cadets talking with the Commandant of the Town Guard, an elderly sheik. An animal skin [possibly a cheetah] is nailed to the wall of the verandah of their bungalow. an atmospheric memeneto of the East India Company era. Belgaum was a military station in the Bombay Presidency, some way to the south west of Kolhapur. The drawing, on paper is tipped to a piece of an old thicker paper album leaf. The drawing measures 7 x 6ins [18 x 15cm].

£55.00
Barrackpore House, near Calcutta, an unrestored oil painting of the early 19th century 11223

The oil painting on canvas measures about 18 x 15ins and is in a contemporary wood and gesso gilt frame measuring 23 x 20ins overall. In line with our usual practice we offer this painting as it came to us, from a source in Scotland, and there are small areas of flaking to the paint on the two sentry boxes. The somewhat naive but pleasing view shows the Governor General’s residence from the approach across the river with its two distinctive sentry boxes: a sepoy stands at the entrance to the bridge. Barrackpore House was appropriated from the Commander in Chief by the Marquis Wellesley [brother of the Duke of Wellington] when he was Governor General. The house was altered considerably and enlarged during the nineteenth century but this painting shows it as it would have appeared in the first few decades. There appears to be no signature on the canvas. We find that nowadays we come across very few oil paintings of Indian subjects other than portraits.

£1,750.00
Finely painted miniature of a Moghul princess, 19th century 00000914

A good painted miniature portrait of a Moghul Princess, probably painted in the 3rd quarter of the nineteenth century when such items were often brought to Britain by those who had visited India or bay families who had been serving there. This example is rather larger and more impressive than the usual miniature, the oval image measuring 8 x 11cm. It is fitted into its carved ebony frame within a metal rim that retains the bevelled glass. The overall size of the frame is 13 x 20.5cm and the metal strut on the back has an ink name which probably reads "Zabriel Neean". The princess holds a rose and wears elaborate dress, jewellery and headdress. She is seated on cushioned throne. There is a small chip to the ebony along the top edge and the metal rim is a little rusty.

£750.00
Finely painted portrait of a Moghul Princess, possibly Mumtaz Mahal 00000915

A good painted miniature portrait of a Moghul Princess, probably painted in the 3rd quarter of the nineteenth century when such items were often brought to Britain by those who had visited India or bay families who had been serving there. This example is rather a central oval recess, the bevelled glass remains but the metal retaining rim is lacking. The oval image, painted on ivory, measuring 8 x 11cm, is in excellent condition. The overall size of the frame is 13 x 21.5cm and the metal strut stand is lacking from the reverse. This princess, possibly intending to represent the wife of Emperor Shah Jehan is shown holding a curved ceremonial sword with lion pommel and within a red velvet scabbard. She wears elaborate dress and jewelled headdress and is seated on a velvet upholstered silver throne chair.

£650.00
Oil painting of an unidentified colonnaded building by an Indian river, early 19th century 00000924

The attractive oil painting, on canvas, measures approximately 13 x 10inches and is presently mounted in a 19th century gilt gesso frame. The painting is early 19th century and shows a handsome neo classical building in the Palladian manner, colonnaded on the three visible sides and with six giant columns of the doric order in the centre of the facing elevation. The building is of two storeys and stands on raised ground overlooking a wide river on the far side of which is a distant white stuccoed building with a central dome. The most likely place for sucha scene is probably on the Hooghly in the Barrackpore area north of Calcutta but it could also perhaps be in Madras.

£1,600.00
The 10th Hussars in India, Kirkee 1854. pair of lithographs published by Ackermann in 1855 00000981

Two lithographs, each image approximately 13 x 9ins not including titles and margins. They are both framed in old Hogarth style black frames with bits of the gilt beading lacking but quite sound. Following an accident here the second lithograph is no longer glazed! We are prepared to sell the pictures separately in which case the first one described is £250 and the one in tropical dress is £150. The back boards have the original retailer’s label of Arthur Ackermann & Son of Regent Street. One lithograph shows two mounted officers, one in dress uniform with pelisse, sabretache and his horse with the elaborate shabraque with regimental devices, the other in undress uniform and with a white protective dust cover over his shako. One officer is replacing his sword and the other is chatting to a senior unmounted officer who wears a rock coat and pill box cap. He is balanced by a sergeant on the left. The second image is subtitled “In front of the Main Guard” and shows an officer wearing tropical dress with other soldiers in the background near tyhe regiment’s horses. Kirkee was a station near Poona and two battles took place there in about 1817. An attractive pair of pictures. We are reluctant to send these abroad in their frames because of the problem with glass but would send them with the original back boards with the Ackermann labels if required. Price £350 the pair. RESERVED

£350.00
Lucknow 1858. The Meeting of Sir Colin Campbell with Havelock and Outram 00001142

A particularly fine example of this magnificently large and detailed engraving after Thomas Jones Barker, engraved by Charles George Lewis. The overall size of this example is 56½ x 33½ ins with margins of 1¾ins outside the plate marks. It is printed on card which shows no signs of foxing. This being an artist’s proof copy before the addition of title and printing details, as shown by the pencil signatures of artist and engraver, means that it is likely to be one of the very finest examples before the plate began to show signs of wear. The reverse of the card has the usual dust marks and a line where the large frame required for such needed strengthening but, unlike copies of prints on thinner paper, that shadow has not penetrated to the printed side. Barker [1816-1882] was a painter best known for his military subjects. This picture was based on drawings made by a Swedish artist who was present. The original, now in the National Portrait Gallery in London, was shown to Queen Victoria on its completion in 1860 and received the royal approval. An index print identifying many of the figures does exist and we are currently trying to locate a copy. Examples of this print, often reproduced in books on the period, are not easy to find, especially in good condition. The sheer size of this print must have limited its wide sale and examples only tend to be found in large houses. Examples at auction include a framed one [with a repaired tear into the image] in Christies Visions of India Sale of June 1996 [hammer price £4,850] and a very interesting example in a frame with military trophies was withdrawn from an Edinburgh sale a few years ago when the family decided to keep it.

POA